Changeset - 5ac283b54a87
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Bradley M. Kuhn - 12 months ago 2020-10-01 17:52:25
bkuhn@sfconservancy.org
Various typo fixes and minor textual improvements.
1 file changed with 26 insertions and 26 deletions:
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www/conservancy/static/copyleft-compliance/enforcement-strategy.html
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@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
 
  software, and defending free software with practical initiatives.
 
  Conservancy accomplishes these goals with various initiatives, including
 
  defending and upholding the rights of software users and consumers under
 
  copyleft licenses, such as the GPL.</p>
 
  copyleft licenses, such as the <acronym title="General Public License">GPL</acronym>.</p>
 

	
 
<h2 id="brief-history-of-user-focused-gpl-enforcement">Brief History of
 
  User-Focused GPL Enforcement</h2>
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@@ -33,28 +33,28 @@
 
  project) and Harald Welte (major contributor to Linux’s netfilter
 
  subsystem) — to enforce the
 
  GPL. <a href="https://sfconservancy.org/about/staff/#bkuhn">Bradley
 
  M. Kuhn</a>, who is now Conservancy’s Policy Analyst and
 
  M. Kuhn</a>, who is now Conservancy’s Policy Fellow and
 
  Hacker-in-Residence, led and coordinated that coalition (when he was
 
  Executive Director of the FSF). By early 2004, this coalition, through the
 
  Executive Director of the <acronym title="Free Software Foundation">FSF</acronym>). By early 2004, this coalition, through the
 
  process of GPL enforcement, compelled Linksys to release an
 
  almost-GPL-compliant source release for the
 
  WRT54G. A <a href="https://openwrt.org/about/history">group of volunteers
 
  quickly built a new project, called OpenWRT</a> based on that source
 
  release. In the years that have followed, OpenWRT has been ported to almost
 
  quickly built a new project, called OpenWrt</a> based on that source
 
  release. In the years that have followed, OpenWrt has been ported to almost
 
  every major wireless router product.  Now, more than 15 years later, the
 
  OpenWRT project routinely utilizes GPL source releases to build, improve
 
  and port OpenWRT.  The project has also joined coalitions to fight the FCC
 
  OpenWrt project routinely utilizes GPL source releases to build, improve
 
  and port OpenWrt.  The project has also joined coalitions to fight the FCC
 
  to ensure that consumers have and deserve rights to install modified
 
  firmwares on their devices and that such hobbyist improvements are no
 
  threat to spectrum regulation.</p>
 

	
 
<p>Recently, OpenWRT decided to join Conservancy as one its member projects,
 
<p>Recently, <a href="https://sfconservancy.org/news/2020/sep/10/openwrt-joins/">OpenWrt joined Conservancy as one its member projects</a>,
 
  and Conservancy has committed to long-term assistance to this project.</p>
 

	
 
<p>OpenWRT has spurred companies to create better routers and other wireless
 
  devices than they would otherwise have designed because they now need to
 
  either compete with hobbyists, or (better still) cooperate with them to
 
  create hardware that fully supports OpenWRT’s features and improvements
 
<p>OpenWrt has spurred companies to create better routers and other wireless
 
  devices than such companies would otherwise have designed because they now need to
 
  either compete with hobbyists, or (better still) cooperate with those hobbyists to
 
  create hardware that fully supports OpenWrt’s features and improvements
 
  (such as dealing
 
  with <a href="https://openwrt.org/docs/guide-user/network/traffic-shaping/sqm">the
 
  dreaded “bufferbloat” bugs</a>). This interplay between the hobbyist
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@@ -63,23 +63,23 @@
 
  modify the software on their devices, the hobbyist community
 
  shrinks. Without intervention to ensure companies respect the hobbyist
 
  community, hobbyists are limited by the oft-arbitrary manufacturer-imposed
 
  restraints in the OEM firmware. OpenWRT saved the wireless router market
 
  restraints in the OEM firmware. OpenWrt saved the wireless router market
 
  from this disaster; we seek to help other embedded electronic subindustries
 
  avoid that fate. The authors of GPL’d software chose that license so its
 
  source is usable and readily available to hobbyists. It is our duty, as
 
  activists for the software freedom of hobbyists, to ensure these legally
 
  mandated rights are never curtailed.</p>
 

	
 
<p>(More on the OpenWRT project’s history and its connection to GPL
 
<p>(More on the OpenWrt project’s history and its connection to GPL
 
  enforcement can be found
 
  in <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4lCMx-EI1s">Kuhn’s talk
 
    at <em>OpenWRT Summit 2016</em></a>.)</p>
 
    at <em>OpenWrt Summit 2016</em></a>.)</p>
 

	
 
<p>Conservancy has had substantial success in leveraging more device freedom
 
  in other subindustries through GPL compliance. In 2009, Conservancy, with
 
  co-Plaintiff Erik Andersen, sued fourteen defendants in federal court under
 
  copyright claims on behalf of its BusyBox member project. Conservancy was
 
  able to achieve compliance for the BusyBox project in all fourteen
 
  copyright claims on behalf of its BusyBox member project. Conservancy 
 
  achieved compliance for the BusyBox project in all fourteen
 
  cases. Most notably, the GPL-compliant source release obtained in the
 
  lawsuit for certain Samsung televisions provided the basis for
 
  the <a href="https://www.samygo.tv/">SamyGo project</a> — an alternative
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@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@
 
  his <a href="https://gpl-violations.org/">gpl-violations.org
 
    project</a>. Harald successfully sued many companies (mostly in the
 
  wireless router industry) in Germany to achieve compliance and yield source
 
  releases that helped OpenWRT during that period.</p>
 
  releases that helped OpenWrt during that period.</p>
 

	
 
<h2 id="importance-of-linux-enforcement-specifically">Importance of Linux Enforcement Specifically</h2>
 

	
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@@ -117,9 +117,9 @@
 
  collection</a>.</p>
 

	
 
<p>There is one overarching irony to this growing dystopia: nearly all these
 
  devices are based primarily on software licensed under the GPL: most
 
  devices are based primarily on GPL'd software: most
 
  notably, Linux. While Linux-based systems do allow proprietary user-space
 
  applications not licensed under GPL, the kernel and many other system
 
  applications (i.e., not licensed under GPL), the kernel and many other system
 
  utilities routinely used in embedded systems, such as Conservancy’s BusyBox
 
  project, are under that license (or similar copyleft licenses such as the
 
  LGPL). These licenses require device makers to provide complete,
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@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@
 
  that source code must also include “the scripts used to control compilation
 
  and installation of the executable”. In short, the consumers must receive
 
  all the source code and the ability to modify, recompile and reinstall that
 
  software. Upholding of this core freedom for Linux made OpenWRT
 
  software. Upholding of this core freedom for Linux made OpenWrt
 
  possible. We work to preserve (or, more often, restore) that software
 
  freedom for consumers of other types of electronic devices.</p>
 

	
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@@ -137,15 +137,15 @@
 
  predatory behavior perpetuated by the manufacturers of these devices by
 
  modifying and replacing the software. Hobbyists can aid their community by
 
  providing these alternatives. People with no technical background already
 
  replace firmware on their wireless routers with OpenWRT to both improve
 
  replace firmware on their wireless routers with OpenWrt to both improve
 
  network performance and allay privacy concerns. Furthermore, older
 
  equipment is often saved from planned obsolescence by alternative
 
  solutions. E-recyclers
 
  like <a href="https://www.freegeek.org/">Freegeek</a> do this regularly for
 
  desktop and laptop machines with GNU/Linux distributions like Debian, and
 
  with OpenWRT for wireless routers. We seek to ensure they can do this for
 
  with OpenWrt for wireless routers. We seek to ensure they can do this for
 
  other types of electronic products. However, without the complete,
 
  corresponding source code, including the scripts to control its compilation and
 
  corresponding source code (CCS), including the scripts to control its compilation and
 
  installation, the fundamental purpose of copyleft is frustrated. Consumers,
 
  hobbyists, non-profit e-recyclers and the general public are left without
 
  the necessary tools they need and deserve, and which the license promises
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@@ -277,9 +277,9 @@
 

	
 
<h3 id="alternative-firmware-project">Alternative Firmware Project</h3>
 

	
 
<p>The success of the OpenWRT project, born from GPL enforcement, has an
 
<p>The success of the OpenWrt project, born from GPL enforcement, has an
 
  important component. While we’ve long hoped that volunteers, as they did
 
  with OpenWRT and SamyGo, will take up compliant sources obtained in our GPL
 
  with OpenWrt and SamyGo, will take up compliant sources obtained in our GPL
 
  enforcement efforts and build alternative firmware projects, history shows
 
  us that the creation of such projects is not guaranteed and exceedingly
 
  rare.</p>
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